Ford Took a Giant Step Towards Getting Ahead Of Tesla

Ford Took a Giant Step Towards Getting Ahead Of Tesla

We wrote not too long ago that while Tesla plans to unveil an electric-powered pickup truck soon, Ford — whose F-150 has dominated the truck market for a long time — “can’t let Tesla be seen as the industry’s future leader of electric trucks.” Well, Ford took a giant step Tuesday towards retaining ahead of Tesla by posting a video of an F-150 electric prototype towing a freight train that weighed more than 1 million pounds.

After all, any automaker can show off an idea car or a demo model that may accelerate up and down a drag strip. But it’s necessary to grasp that Ford is already testing the electric-powered F-150, whereas Tesla might be nowhere near as close to rolling out a Tesla electric pickup.

Sure, Tesla will get a lot of publicity whenever it publicly reveals its truck prototype for the first time. However, Tesla will seemingly have only built one or a handful of those prototypes, and they’ll be nowhere close to ready for production. Nor will Tesla’s trucks have gone through any significant “torture testing,” which is where automakers test-drive vehicles in a variety of challenging real-world environments for greater than a year.

Auto corporations will test a truck’s remaining design until they’re assured about what’s called “QRD” — quality, reliability, and sturdiness. You could have confidence that your car will perform effectively for consumers in all situations over potentially dozens of years and hundreds of thousands of miles of truck ownership.

That is why automakers will normally build about 400 prototypes of any new truck, testing them for about 24 months on the earth’s most extreme climates. To do anything less risks an automaker’s status.

After all, issues can go wrong even with proper testing — and they usually do to some extent or the other. Nonetheless, “torture testing” minimizes that probability. You can’t eliminate errors. However, you can cut back their probability.

Richard Addington

Richard Addington

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